F.H. Buckley on *The Republic of Virtue*

F.H. Buckley on *The Republic of Virtue*

When Frank H. Buckley last joined the show, he surprised Bob with a cogent, intellectual case for the election of Donald Trump. Buckley, a Foundation Professor at George Mason University’s Scalia School of Law, advised Team Trump on campaign speeches, and geared his last book, The Way Back, towards a set of practical solutions to “restore the promise of America.”

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Skip Young on The Wisdom of 76: Young America's Way to Wealth

When video surfaces featuring scores of Yale students signing a petition to repeal the First Amendment, “hope” seems to be the hardest word to say. Sadly, the Bill of Rights appears to be on life support, and the up-and-coming generation of Ivy-educated citizens seems less than enthusiastic about resuscitating it. At the same time, the ideas of individualism and free enterprise are still alive and well in the general population, and it’s difficult to imagine anything replacing them. This Sunday, Bob will be embracing this silver lining with Skip Young, a SF-based entrepreneur and author of The Wisdom of 76: Young America’s Way to Wealth. In his debut book, Skip aims to inspire young audiences to the magic of the “invisible hand” – an idea which Adam Smith first put into print the same year that the Declaration of Independence was written. In just 10,000 words, Skip leads readers on a poetic journey of hope and discovery through the Declaration, The Wealth of Nations, Common Sense, and the “Way to Wealth.” A mix of engaging history and hypnotic monetary metaphors, Skip’s tract makes a compelling case that everyone can share in the American Dream with modest effort and a bit of bravery. The Wisdom of 76 may just hold the secret to saving the next generation before they are indoctrinated by the educational system.

Carol Berkin on The Bill of Rights No One Wanted

Vaulted behind a thick glass display case at the National Archives, and revered above the marble edifices and monuments of Washington D.C., sits a faded piece of parchment. In the eyes of many, the Bill of Rights to the U.S. Constitution symbolizes the bedrock ideas on which our country was built. Yet history tends to look past the true origins of this foundational work – a set of amendments, which most in the First U.S. Congress deemed either unnecessary or ineffective at protecting individual liberty. Few know the actual story of the drafting of the Bill of Rights better than Carol Berkin, an award-winning history professor and author of The Bill of Rights: The Fight to Secure Ameri­ca’s Liberties. Berkin joins Bob to trace the history leading up to its formation, with vivid detail on the context and thinking of the key figures in the debate. We learn, for example, that the Bill of Rights is indeed a symbol: Perhaps more than anything, it symbolizes the compromise and perseverance that were required to unite a deeply divided new nation, against all odds. Hear the whole story, this Sunday at 9am PACIFIC/12pm EASTERN, on Talk 910.

Thomas Fleming on *The Great Divide* Between Washington and Jefferson

This Fourth of July, as we reflect on our country's origins, some may be tempted to look upon the Founding Fathers with a reverence otherwise reserved for saints or the founders of great religions. Past generations erected the “Washington” Monument in “Washington” D.C. to honor and symbolize the resoluteness of the man as both a leading general in the Revolutionary War and our nation's first President. Likewise, the immortal words of the Declaration of Independence – the rallying cry of the American Revolution – are inscribed on the walls of the Jefferson Memorial in honor of the man who penned them. However, these mythologies are incomplete according to Thomas Fleming, a historian and novelist who has picked apart the American Revolution from more than a few angles. His latest book, *The Great Divide: The Conflict Between Washington and Jefferson that Defined a Nation*, cuts through the typical "airbrushing" of historical founding figures to reveal the political treachery that truly characterized the era. Fleming joins Bob for a special Fourth (Fifth) of July episode.

Baylen Linnekin on the Front lines of the Fight for Food Freedom

Freedom-lovers everywhere are lamenting the recent Supreme Court decision in King v. Burwell – perhaps the final blow to the constitutional challenge to ObamaCare (or as it may soon be known, SCOTUSCare). There is a silver lining, however, in the form another recent Supreme Court decision, in Horne v. USDA, which upheld the constitutional protections of raisin growers' personal property from takings by the USDA.  Baylen Linnekin is Executive Director of the Keep Food Legal Foundation, an adjunct professor at both American University and George Mason Law School, and a frequent contributor to Reason Magazine. Linnekin submitted an amicus curiae brief in the Horne case, and his arguments were mirrored in the majority opinion – authored by none other than John Roberts – arguing that the USDA cannot require raisin growers to surrender a portion of their crop for the "public purpose" of stabilizing the raisin market. The ruling is a victory to all of those cherish "the right of every American to grow, raise, produce, buy, sell, share, cook, eat, and drink the foods of their own choosing." Bob and Baylen also look at the many ways our food freedoms are still being restricted. You won't leave hungry after this episode of the show of ideas not attitude.

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Overruling Government Overreach: Damon Root on the Libertarian Legal Movement

In his new book "Overruled: The Long War for Control of the U.S. Supreme Court," Reason Magazine Senior Editor Damon Root takes up a central question to our Constitution: Should the courts exercise restraint by allowing lawmakers to craft a wide range of legislation, or should they more actively defend individual rights from being overridden by majority rule? In fighting for the latter position, libertarians find themselves opposed to a long line of legal giants, from the progressive champion Oliver Wendell Holmes to conservative icon Robert Bork. Complicating matters, "judicial activism" has developed a reputation for abuse in the hands of politically-motivated judges. But in recent years, a libertarian legal movement rooted firmly in the Founders' vision of individual rights has grown to challenge the legacy of judicial restraint. Root will join Bob for the full hour this Sunday to discuss how a small "elite core of frontline fighters" has overcome the odds in numerous cases – from gun control to occupational licensing – to persuade judges to overrule government overreach.

All Powerful Federal Government – Did the Founders Blow It?

During the Constitution’s ratification process from September 1787 through mid-1788, each and every federalist (the supporters of ratification) promised America a federal government of limited (i.e. “enumerated”) powers. For about 120 years we were provided with maximum freedom to pursue our lives as we see fit. Promise kept. Then what happened?

The America we live in today is by no means the America that we were supposed to have. Were we given a flawed Constitution? One that mandated an all-controlling, all-seeing, liberty-denying Big Brother that was determined to make all of our personal decisions for us? Clark M. Neily III knows how we got from the government we were promised to the government we now have and he explains it in Terms of Engagement; How Our Courts Should Enforce the Constitution’s Promise of Limited Government. Clark joined Bob to discuss all this and more. You need to know how we got in this mess in order to know how to get out. A must-hear show.